Feature

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Cochabamba, Boliva
International Climate Justice Tribunal
When an arsonist burns down a building he or she is charged with a crime and sometimes serves time. What if a person or a business or a country burns up the planet? Not much. Activists and officials at the Cochabamba Climate Conference in Bolivia called for the formation of an International Climate Justice Tribunal to rule on crimes against the planet.

denmflag Copenhagen, Denmark
Danish Windmill Power
Denmark produces more than one-fifth of all its electricity with about 5,000 windmills. The country produces by far the largest share of its electrical power with wind of any country in the world: enough wind power to supply every Danish house at the period of peak demand on a windy day. In this video, Anja Pedersen, an adviser to the Danish Wind Industry Association, describes the scale, benefits and public attitude toward wind energy in Denmark. Daniel Grossman interviewed Pedersen on a tour of the Middelgrunden offshore wind farm in the Øresund, off the coast of Copenhagen. Middelgrunden was the largest wind farm in the world when it was built in 2000. With 20 turbines and a capacity of 40 MW, the farm can produce 3% of the power used by Copenhagen. Denmark’s energy plans call for the country to generate 50% of its electricity with wind within the next 15 years.
denmflag Copenhagen, Denmark
Heat of the Moment Voices: Super-Efficient Homes
Bo Anderson welcomed a group of energy-efficiency tourists into his home in Egedal — a town about 20 miles outside downtown Copenhagen — to learn about his highly efficient home.
denmflag Hans Meltofte, Denmark
Heat of Moment Voices: Greenland Ecosystems
Hans Meltofte describes the role of the Zackenberg research station in northeast Greenland, which he founded. He describes the changes he’s observed in the climate and wildlife of the region. He was interviewed in his home in Copenhagen, during the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
canflag Shari Gearheard, Canada
Heat of the Moment Voices: Indigenous Knowledge
Shari Gearheard is a geographer and a researcher at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. She lives in an Inuit village on Baffin Island, a base camp from where she studies indigenous perceptions and wisdom about climate change. She meets regularly with a group of hunters, who she peppers with questions about the conditions they’ve experienced. She says native hunters have a lot of knowledge that sheds important light on climate change in the Arctic.
amerflag Thomas Lovejoy, United States
Heat of the Moment Voices: Ocean Acidification
In December 2009, the Convention on Biological Diversity, an international scientific organization, and the United Nations Environment Programme jointly issued a report raising new concerns about a serious problem related to changes in the atmosphere that climate researchers weren’t aware of until about 5 years ago. The problem is called ocean acidification and, like global warming, it is caused by carbon dioxide released into the air when fuels are burned. Carbon dioxide dissolves in the waters of the oceans, creating carbonic acid. The new report says this effect has already made seawater 30 percent more acidic since before industrial burning of coal and oil began about 150 years ago. Over-acidic seawater prevents some species from forming and retaining their shells. And these animals cannot live without protective shells. Thomas Lovejoy, who wrote the preface to the new report, explains what its findings mean. Until recently Lovejoy was president of the Heinz Center on Biodiversity in Washington. Lovejoy was interviewed at the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
denmflag Dorthe Dahl-Jensen, Denmark
Heat of the Moment Voices: Abrupt Climate Change
Dorthe Dahl-Jensen is a geology professor at Copenhagen’s Neils Bohr Institute. She also leads the latest international team drilling a deep ice core in the Greenland Ice Sheet. Here she talks about “abrupt changes” that have been discovered in past climates by studying such ice cores. In some cases, average temperatures in Greenland appear to have changed by 10 or 15 degrees centigrade in a matter of a few decades. She says she wants to figure out if such large-scale changes could be caused today by increased warming. This interview took place in her office during the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
denmflag Dorthe Dahl-Jensen, Denmark
Heat of the Moment Voices: American Attitudes
Dorthe Dahl-Jensen is a geology professor at Copenhagen’s Neils Bohr Institute. She also leads the latest international team drilling a deep ice core in the Greenland Ice sheet. Here she talks about American attitudes toward climate change. Fewer Americans are worried about climate change than the people of other western countries. “That is very strange,” she says. But, she says, the science is clear that global warming is a problem that needs to be addressed. “I hope that evidence and information will change the view [of the American public].” This interview took place in her office during the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
amerflag Stephen Schneider, United States
Heat of the Moment Voices: Public Opinion
Stephen Schneider is a professor of climate research at Stanford University and a lead author of the most recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Here he speculates about why American’s appear so unconcerned about climate change and so opposed to doing anything about it. “The American distrust of government — the belief in the ‘infinite outdoors,’ the ‘wide open spaces’ — has led to a mental frame that is really false.” This interview was recorded during the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
denmflag Hans Meltofte, Denmark
Heat of the Moment Voices: Opinion on Climate Change
Hans Meltofte is an ecologist who founded and conducts fieldwork at Zackenberg research station in northeast Greenland. He says Americans are less educated than Europeans, which is one reason why Americans take the problem of climate change less seriously. He also says that the stronger European tradition of government taking a more prominent role in society makes it easier for European people to accept that a problem requires a societal, rather than individual, solution. Meltofte was interviewed in his home in Copenhagen, during the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
canflag Shari Gearheard, Canada
Heat of the Moment Voices: Climate Change Attitudes
Shari Gearheard is a geographer and a researcher at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. She lives in an Inuit village on Baffin Island, a base camp from where she studies indigenous perceptions and wisdom about climate change. She says American’s can’t connect with the problem of climate change because they can’t experience it on a visceral level. Gearheard was interviewed at the Copenhagen Climate Conference.
amerflag James Hansen, New York
Heat of the Moment Voices: James Hansen
James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Space Science Institute, says that if the world continues with “business as usual” without seriously addressing the challenges of global warming” the changes will be so extreme that Earth will be like “a different planet.”